Make conscious decisions about the best ways to serve customers and prospects.

  
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17 Jun 2019
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Recognize and overcome the barriers to developing conscious channel strategiesRecognize and overcome the barriers to developing conscious channel strategies

The barriers to conscious decision-making about best ways to serve are substantial.

In large companies the channel organization is often separate from the group charged with developing sales and marketing strategy. Sometimes it’s in a different division. This situation raises all kinds of issues of turf and control. We mitigate, or eliminate, these issues by developing our strategies based on the customer relationship and consistently incorporating channel considerations in that development.

Small companies tend to take an all-or-nothing approach to decisions about using channels. Generally they do so because they have, or think they have, insufficient resources to do more than a few things. Competition may also force them to move in a particular direction. Taking the time to consider all of the alternatives and create as complete a context as possible inevitably leads to better channel decisions and more profitable sales and customer relationships. 

  

Strategy Development and Channels 

The channel dimension of strategies can run the gamut.

Channel Aware
These strategies are developed by any customer-facing organization. They are not directly related to best ways to serve the customer and simply take channel implications into consideration. The organization developing them needs to consciously address those implications with cross-functional colleagues.

Channel Specific
Channel strategies, which might be developed by one or more customer-facing organizations, focus on all aspects of specific channels. The organization developing the strategy must actively engage other customer-facing organizations in their development.

All customer-facing strategies must be based on customer relationships and, at a minimum, be channel-aware, not as an afterthought, but as a key part of strategy development and strategic decision-making.

  

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